Zen practice can be whittled down to two playful questions:

What is this? and Who is this?

What is this?

When we open to the question, ‘What is this?’ everything we perceive and think becomes an invitation to wonder. We’re invited to see this, and to see through this.

Who is this?

When we open to the question, ‘Who is this?’ our very existence becomes a playground of curiosity. We look deeply into this person who is seeing and thinking.

We may believe we already know who we are; who others are.

But really, who is this?

Sit with this

As you meditate, join the stream of our ancestors and hold these questions. Hold them lightly, not to find answers, but to come alive with curiosity and wonder.

Please: Don’t wait; time is short.

What is this?

Who is this?

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The Morning Light Sangha has now gathered for online meditations more than 350 times. It’s easy for the miracle of our shared presence to become mundane.

I’ve begun practicing with a Gatha to remind me how precious our moments together are. You might want to join me:

Gathering online,

I bow

This screen is a mirror

Reflecting my many faces

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May I be happy and safe, and may my heart be filled with joy.

Your invitation is to walk the path of lovingkindness.

The path walks itself

We enter the path with a desire to control the world, thinking:

‘May external circumstances go well for me so that my heart is at ease.’

As we travel the path, we try to control ourselves, thinking:

‘May I know happiness in all circumstances.’

Eventually, our True Self rises to voice an aspiration both inclusive and generous:

‘May all beings know the happiness and joy of complete release.’

Wherever you are is ok. Please be there fully. The path will take you where you need to go. Judgement is excess baggage.

May I be happy and safe, and may my heart be filled with joy.

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Jonathan Prescott

Jonathan Prescott

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| Zen Teacher • Spiritual Director • Hospice Chaplain | Bring your heart and life into balance using the insights of contemplative practice.